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Est. 1921

History

CURRICULUM VISION

INTENT:

What is the curriculum aim / vision for this subject?

  • For students to have an enjoyment of history.

  • The curriculum allows students to have a rounded understanding of the past and gives an insight how this impacts on the present and future

  • The curriculum should give students the opportunity to become critical thinkers who are able to articulate, analyse, explain and infer.

What do we expect students to get from this subject?

  • Broadening understanding of their role in the community.

  • Enhance skills, ambition and questioning to improve employability.

  • Enjoyment of history. 

  • Understanding of different cultures, traditions and opinions to develop kindness and tolerance.

IMPLEMENTATION:

How does learning develop over the five years?

  • The skills required as a student transitions through the five years are built upon through clear stepping stones.

  • The curriculum provides students with a broad knowledge and understanding of history

What principles have guided our decision making in developing this curriculum? What is distinctive about our curriculum?

  • There is a clear focus on developing students understanding of where they live.

  • Key events and periods are taught to give students an understanding of how these have shaped Britain and the wider world.

  • The skills gained on initial arrival to the school lay the foundations for deeper thinking year on year.

How is the timetabled curriculum supplemented or enriched by other approaches to learning?

  • Engaging lessons which students enjoy and want to participate in.

  • Student involvement in assemblies such as Remembrance Day assemblies.

  • Use of presentations and drama to assist with oracy skills.

  • Student trips, for example to visit the Battlefields.

In what ways does our curriculum help to develop…?

  • Cultural diversity and identity: Knowledge and understanding of students role in the community and the wider world

  • Physically and mentally healthy lifestyles: Focus of how war can have an impact on lifestyle and mental health

  • Community participation: Teaching aspects of the curriculum allows us to draw on the community such as Remembrance assemblies

  • Careers and enterprise: All of the skills taught throughout the curriculum allow for students to gain skills necessary for their future careers

  • Technology and the media: Use of media and awareness of the benefits and dangers of the modern media.

  • Creativity and critical thinking: Through engagement and love of learning and the skills required for history are intrinsically linked to critical thinking.

IMPACT:

What forms do assessments take? What is the purpose of assessment?

  • Self and peer assessment

  • Summative and formative assessments

  • Assessments mirror those skills required at GCSE. The assessments are robust and highlight any deficiencies in skills that staff can quickly act upon to improve knowledge and understanding in order for students to make progress through further studies.

How do we know if we have a successful curriculum?

  • Students enjoy and achieve academic attainment.

  • Feedback through students’ voice.

  • Feedback from parents.

  • Option numbers at GCSE and A Level

  • Staff evaluations of the curriculum.

CURRICULUM CONTENT

KEY STAGE 3

The topics covered at Key Stage 3 offer pupils a broad understanding of a range of historical events at local, national and international levels.

Programme of Study – Lesson Listings Year 7, 8 and 9 – Term 1

 

YEAR 7

YEAR 8

YEAR 9

 

How did the Norman conquest shape England?

Was the Industrial Revolution a period of growth and prosperity for all?

Was Hitler really responsible for the outbreak of World War Two?

1

England before 1066 what was it like?

From farming to factories - What was Britain like in 1750?

Why did the population explode?

Treaty of Versailles recap and International relations 1930s

2

1066: Who will be the next King of England?

Round 1: Stamford Bridge

How did factories create towns?

What was it like to work in a factory?

Hitler’s foreign policy

 

3

Round 2: Hastings

What was it like to live in an industrial town? Local focus: Liverpool

Who were the heroes of public health?

Appeasement

 

4

How did Harold die?

Why did William win?

How was transport improved?

 

Nazi Soviet Pact and Outbreak of WW2

 

5

Baseline Hastings Assessment

Crime, Prisons and the police

The British Empire

Causes of WW2 Assessment

6

The conquest of England – Harrying of the North

William the castle builder

Interpretations of the British Empire

How and why were Jews persecuted by the Nazis

Anti-Semitism a history

 

7

The Feudal System

The Domesday Book

Assessment Impact of the industrial Revolution

Nazi persecution of the Jews

 

Where did power truly lie in Medieval England?

How should the slave trade be remembered?

 

 

8

How religious were people in the Middle Ages?

Crown Versus Church: the story of Henry II and Thomas Becket

Africa before the slave trade

How did the Slave Trade work? (inc triangle)

The Holocaust (optional Holocaust assessment)

9

Murder in the cathedral

assessment: how useful source analysis (light)

How were slaves captured?

What was the middle passage?

How did Britain survive World War Two?

Outbreak of WW2 and early German success

10

King John: Magna Carta man

 

What happened on arrival?

What was life like on the Plantations?

Battle of Britain/Blitz: Liverpool Focus

11

Where did our Parliament come from?

Could slaves fight for their freedom?

Could slaves escape to freedom?

Dunkirk Barbarossa

12

Medieval Queens

Why was there an American Civil War?

How was slavery abolished?

Pearl Harbour

13

Liverpool focus: Why was 1207 so important?

Slave Trade assessment

D Day

Programme of Study – Lesson Listings Year 7, 8 and 9 – Term 2

 

YEAR 7

YEAR 8

YEAR 9

 

Was the Medieval period truly miserable for all?

How democratic was Britain by 1928?

How were the Axis Powers defeated?

1

What was life like in a medieval village?

What was life like in a medieval town?

What is democracy?

How does politics work in Britain?

Revision

2

Could you have fun in the Middle Ages?

Middle Ages: Sport

Protest in 1800s

Peterloo Massacre

Y9 PATHWAYS EXAM – Hitler and the Jews, the Holocaust and WW2

3

Middle Ages: Entertainment

Middle Ages: Food and fashion

How did working men get the vote?

What were Victorian attitudes towards women?

Atom bombs

4

How did castles develop?

Medieval health and medicine

Suffragists or Suffragettes

The impact of the end of War on International Relations

5

How deadly was the Black Death?

Did Emily Davison mean to die?

Women and WW1

The World of the 1950s and 60s

6

Why were the peasants so angry in 1381?

Did England change after the Black Death?

Light touch assessment – Peterloo or Women and the vote

The World of the 1970s and 80s

7

Could you get justice in the Middle Ages?

Keeping law and order, Trial and Punishment

Did the world go to war by ‘accident’ or by ‘choice’ in 1914?

What were the long term causes of conflict prior to 1914?

How successfully was racial injustice challenged in the USA 1945-75?

Segregation in the South – Jim Crow laws

8

Medieval life end of unit assessment

What happened at Sarajevo in 1914?

 

KKK

 

Was Henry VIII a cruel dictator?

What was it like to live through World War One?

 

9

Wars of the Roses

Bosworth

Outbreak of war and Failure of the war Plans

Recruitment and propaganda

Civil rights organisations – CORE, NAACP

10

What was young Henry VIII like?

Henry VIII his first wife and his big problem

Strategies and tactics of trench warfare

Weaponry

Opposition to Civil Rights, Emmet Till

11

What did Protestants protest about?

Why did Henry dissolve the monasteries?

Soldiers experience of war

 

Brown V Topeka

12

Henry VIII – light touch assessment

Edward and Mary

Medical provision during the war RAMC & FANY

Little Rock

Programme of Study – Lesson Listings Year 7, 8 and 9 – Term 3

 

YEAR 7

YEAR 8

YEAR 9

 

How important was religion in Tudor & Stuart society?

Was the Treaty of Versailles to blame for Hitler

Civil, Rights, Protest and Radicalism

1

Elizabeth and religion

Why did Elizabeth kill her cousin?

Case Study: The Somme

 

Bus Boycott

2

Spanish Armada: England versus Spain

Interpretations of the Somme

Sits Ins

3

Gunpowder plot

Were the plotters framed?

Conscientious Objectors

The contribution of the British Empire to War

Freedom Rides

4

Witches

Impact of WW1 and Big 3

Versailles

Birmingham

5

Summer Exam Revision

Summer Exam Revision

Washington

6

Summer Exam

Summer Exam

Freedom Summer

7

Did democracy win the English Civil War?

Why did the English fight each other?

Who was Adolf Hitler, other dictators?

Malcolm X

8

Why was Charles I sentenced to death?

Hitler’s rise to power and establishing control

Black Power

9

Oliver Cromwell: hero or villain

Who was the Merry Monarch?

Life in Nazi Germany – young people

Race Riots

10

The Glorious Revolution

Life in Nazi Germany – women

MLK 1967-68

11

How had Britain changed 1066-1750?

Life in Nazi Germany - workers

Progress by 1975

KEY STAGE 4

For more information, click here to visit the Key Stage 4 courses page.

KEY STAGE 5

For more information, click here to visit the Key Stage 5 courses page.